Open Doors 2015: What to expect with international student enrollment trends?

How has the enrollment of international students at higher education institutions in the United States changed in fall 2014 as compared to fall 2013? The Open Doors 2015 will be released on November 16, 2015 to answer this question.

projections of future enrollment of international students IIE

Here is my forecast of two leading source countries, China and India, from previous articles published in UniversityWorldNews:

Universities need to get ready for India’s highfliers” August 2014

“A new wave of demand for global education among Indian ‘high fliers’ is set to take-off. These children of professionals who started working in new-age industries in the late ’90s will create a new opportunity for foreign higher education institutions interested in engaging with India.”

“In sum, I define Indian ‘high fliers’ as children born in the late ’90s to parents working in new-age industries like IT, financial services and telecommunications. Many of these ‘high flier’ students will start exploring undergraduate colleges in 2015 and many others will apply for masters programmes in a few years’ time.”

The end of the China growth story?” July 2015

“In sum, the overall demand for foreign education among Chinese students will continue to be robust. However, there will be a shift in student segments and their decision-making processes. “

“The increase in Chinese students at the undergraduate level was primarily driven by the growth of ‘Explorers’, those with high financial resources and low academic preparedness….Given the size and scale of the wealthy class in China, the demand for undergraduate and high school education abroad will continue to be strong. However, self-funded graduate education at both the masters and doctoral levels will face challenges for the next couple of years.”

While the upcoming report will again indicate important mobility trends, we should not forget the importance of investigating and investing in international student success and their experiences. “By only focusing on input metrics like recruitment goals rather than student success, institutions run the risk of damaging their reputation and competitive positioning.”

Dr. Rahul Choudaha