Defining the future of internationalisation in Europe

A recent study entitled ‘Internationalisation of Higher Education‘ in the European context provides a comprehensive perspective on what is the current state of internationalization is and what should it look like in future.

IAU, EAIE, Europe survey findings on internationalisation highered

The study critically analyzed the key literature in the field of international higher education and coupled it with survey findings from three sources–IAU 4th Global Survey on Internationalisation of Higher Education, The EAIE Barometer: Internationalisation in Europe, and Delphi survey (with support from Robert Coelen).

The study funded by the European Parliament was undertaken by some of the leading researchers and thinkers in the field-Hans de Wit, Fiona Hunter, Laura Howard and Eva Egron-Pola. The blend of comprehensive background research along with deep expertise of the authors resulted in this influential, landmark publication.

The ten recommendations (I wonder, why it rhymes with ten commandments) of the study have the potential to create a more meaningful future state of internationalization in Europe:
“1. Address the challenges of credit and degree mobility imbalances and institutional cooperation, stemming from substantial differences in higher education systems, procedures and funding.
2. Recognise the growing popularity of work placements and build options to combine them with language and cultural skills training and study abroad.
3. Support the important role of academic and administrative staff in the further development of IoHE.
4. Foster greater higher education and industry collaboration in the context of mobility of students and staff.
5. Pay more attention to the importance of ‘Internationalisation at home’, integrating international and intercultural learning outcomes into the curriculum for all students.
6. Remove the barriers that impede the development of joint degrees.
7. Develop innovative models of digital and blended learning as an instrument to complement IoHE.
8. Align IoHE with internationalisation at other levels of education (primary, secondary, vocational and adult education).
9. Stimulate bilingual and multilingual learning at the primary and secondary education level as a basis for a language policy based on diversity.
10.Remove barriers between internationalisation of research and education, at all levels, for greater synergy and opportunity.”

Here are related analysis and coverage of the study:
Penetrating insights into internationalisation progress, University World News
Internationalisation: variations and vagaries, University World News
Internationalisation should be for all – Landmark study, University World News
Academic values ‘at risk’ in internationalisation, says report, Times Higher Ed
EU study: internationalisation must reach all levels of education, The PIE News