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Dr. Rahul Choudaha is a keynote speaker at Lewy Global Education Technology Forum @ SIT

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The Lewy Global Education Technology Forum at the School of International Training (SIT), Brattleboro, VT will bring together leaders in the field of education to discuss challenges and opportunities to improve our use of technology to teach, to collaborate, and to include a diversity of students, faculty, and staff in achieving our mission of education the next generation of global leaders.

Dr. Rahul Choudaha of DrEducation will be delivering a keynote on Tuesday, April 25 on "Accelerating Campus Internationalization with Technology: Emerging Trends and Strategies."

Here is the brief description:
As technology solutions become increasingly sophisticated and innovative, students are not only embracing this change, they are also expecting more. However, higher education institutions in general lag behind in technology innovation and student adoption. For example, MOOCs (massive open online courses) have gone from being revolutionary to redundant with varying degrees of accept…

Webinar resources: The future of online higher education and global engagement

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How likely it is that by 2020 “degrees will be disaggregated into smaller credential units… with the possibility that the credentialing entity may be different from the institution that offers the course”? The majority (68%) of the webinar participants responding to a poll question based on MIT’s Future of Education report expect it to be a "likely" or "very likely" scenario of higher education.


The online discussion was second in the series of online thought leadership discussions hosted by University World News and DrEducation. The online discussion on the theme of "Embracing Technology for Global Engagement: A Leadership Challenge and Opportunity" attracted nearly 700 registrations from around the world.

Access the webinar recording below
Access the PowerPoint slides 
Read the UWN summary article
Access Twitter feeds with #GlobalEd2




The webinar moderated by Dr. Rahul Choudaha, principal researcher & CEO, DrEducation included following expert panel:
Gi…

4 reasons why LinkedIn may be a gamechanger in global university rankings

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Much has been debated and researched about the uses and abuses of university rankings. Now, the arena of global university rankings has a new contender, LinkedIn, which has the potential to change the future of the rankings game. Here are the four reasons in support of LinkedIn’s potential.


1. Sharper focus on career outcomes
LinkedIn is focused on career outcomes. One of the biggest limitations of the rankings is that they focus on students as consumers of information, while their methodologies focus on proxies like research citations. An alternative approach is to use metrics that directly impact students. In a cost-conscious environment where the value of higher education is under increasing scrutiny, return on investment and career outcome is becoming more important for students.

2. Deeper view at program level
The multi-disciplinary and comprehensive nature of universities is better captured by program rankings than by university rankings. Program-level rankings are not only more…

Will Education Innovation Move from Fringes to the Core of System?

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Over the last decade, I have presented or chaired nearly 100 sessions at professional conferences on the themes of higher education internationalization trends and strategies with an emphasis on enrollment management, student mobility and transnational education.
Recently, I attended a conference outside my regular "conference circuit" to not only expand my perspectives and network on education technology (ed-tech or edtech), but also to learn from entrepreneurs and investors. The ASU+GSV Summit defines itself as "the Knowledge Economy's Mecca of conversation and activism devoted to accelerating learning innovation around the world." The conference is hosted by GSV, a private equity group and Arizona State University (ASU), which is at the forefront of innovation through online education and strategic partnerships like Starbucks and now edX.
The conference exceeded my expectations in terms of scale and quality. The conference has grown from 250 to 2500 atten…

Six findings from latest research on MOOCs learners

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"HarvardX and MITx: Two Years of Open Online Courses Fall 2012-Summer 2014" report is based on "one of the largest surveys of massive open online courses (MOOCs) to date: 68 courses, 1.7 million participants, 10 million participanthours, and 1.1 billion logged events."
The research has six key findings: Growth is steady in overall and multiple-course participation in HarvardX and MITx Participation initially declines in repeated courses, then stabilizes Surveys suggest that a slight majority intends to certify. Many are teachers. Participation and certification differ by curricular area Course networks reveal the centrality of large CS courses and the potential of sequenced modules Certification rates are high among those who pay $25-$250 to “ID-verify” their certificates The report identified opportunities along following three dimensions: Identify course-level and institutional priorities for increased access Increase and formalize the flow of pedagogical innova…

Pearson--lessons in strategy and change from a global education company

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A recent story in the Fortune magazine traces the transformation of Pearson from a traditional publishing house to a global education company poised for an digital learning era. The attention-grabbing headline "Everybody hates Pearson" leads the reader into an insightful story of opportunities and challenges faced by Pearson in the pursuit of its strategic choice of focusing on "data-driven education." Here is a timeline of the major milestones in Pearson's history.   Pearson in its recently released annual report notes that "Pearson’s strategy centres on a significant and exciting long-term opportunity: the sustained and growing global demand for greater access, achievement and affordability in education." It adds that "Pearson stands at the intersection of new technology (with its ability to engage, personalise, diagnose and scale) and new, more effective, ways of teaching." In 2015, five priorities will guide Pearson's work: …

Global reach of MOOCs: A comparison of HarvardX and MITx

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MOOCs are a learning innovation with technology as it's backbone. Any technological innovation goes through a phase of irrational exuberance to mature reality (Remember, the dot-com bust and now dot-com revival). MOOCs are going through similar evolutionary pangs. Learning innovations face quite a complex set of barriers due to the sheer sociopolitical and traditional nature of the education ecosystem and hence the future of MOOCs even more uncertain. However, I am optimistic about the access, outreach and continuing education potential of MOOCs. Consider the recent data released by HarvardX and MITx which provides insights about its global reach:


- World map of certificate attainment: 17.5% certificate attainment rate of student from Spain for HarvardX - World map of gender composition: 28% of registrants from Oman for MITx were female; higher than Germany (25%) - World map of education composition: 85% of registrants of MITx from France held a Bachelor's degree or higher as…

The role of online learning and glocal students in shaping university internationalization strategies

International branch campuses receive lot of media attention. Some of the recent endeavors from big brands like NYU Shanghai and Yale-NUS College, gives a perception that many more are building international branch campuses, however, they form a very small proportion of various models of engagement for university internationalization.
Consider the case of the UK, which have been promoting transnational education as a part of the national strategy, has less than 3% of all its TNE activity in branch campuses. Only ~17,500 of  ~600,000 students enrolled in an "overseas campus of a UK HEI." In addition, one out of five overseas students is studying for a UK degree through distance learning programs (Open University is the largest). This is also the learning model which is gaining a lot of buzz with technological innovation, MOOCS and competency-based learning.
In a recent presentation at the AIEA conference, the panel shared the opportunities and challenges presented by the use…

Looking back at international higher eduction in 2013: The year of funding constraints, regulatory pressures and learning innovations

At the beginning of 2013, I projected that the three mega-trends influencing global higher education will be related to university budgets/funding, regulatory environment and technological innovations. I concluded that 2013 will be a year in which the higher education sector, will be under increasing pressure to justify its value, not only from financial and regulatory side pressures but due to emergence of competing technology-enabled learning models like MOOCs.

By the end of 2013, there have been several developments aligning with the  mega-trends forecast. Here are some of the key stories from 2013.

- Funding and university budgets: Given that higher education is tightly coupled with the economy, a sense of recovery is also reflecting a slight turnaround in university budgets in the US. However, optimism is not reflected in self-sufficiency through tuition revenue as the college enrollment in the US declines. In a recent survey,  about four in 10 public universities report that tui…

Can Laureate Change the Landscape of Global Higher Education?

Earlier this year, IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, announced an investment of $150 million in common stock of Laureate Education, Inc., representing IFC’s largest education investment. This was a landmark development in the world of international higher education, as it validated the model of Laureate with a significant investment. What made Laureate so successful?


Chris Boehner of Vericant shares his entrepreneurial journey

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Chris Boehner, Executive Director, Vericant
TwitterLinkedIn
After graduating from the College of Charleston with a degree in Corporate and Organizational Communications, Chris decided to follow in his grandfather’s footsteps and move to China. During his seven years in China, Chris’s background can best be described as eclectic.  He was a corporate trainer for Microsoft, then decided to cycle across Asia and Africa working as a translator (you wouldn’t believe how useful Mandarin is in Sudan). Afterward, he managed Omega’s transportation logistics during the Beijing Olympics then spent two years intensively studying Mandarin. His proudest achievement is being a founding member of Beijing’s first bluegrass band–The Redbucks. During Chris’s ever-dwindling free time, you can find him in Beijing’s historic hutongs, playing mandolin or practicing Mandarin.

Rahul- What are the key services your organization provides? How would you describe your target customer and the unmet needs you are ser…

international education as a pathway for immigrant entrepreneurs

While the immigration reform in the US is overcast with uncertainty, I came across a very interesting blog in the New York Times by Catherine Rampell asking "is it true that immigrants are unusually entrepreneurial?" And the data suggests, yes. The highlights are:
Business ownership rate is higher for immigrants than the native-born. In 2010, 10.5 percent of the immigrant work force owned a business compared with 9.3 percent of the native-born work force.Immigrants are also more likely to start a business in any given month. In 2010, 620 out of every 100,000 non-business-owning immigrants started a business each month as compared to 280 for nonimmigrants. "Immigrants’ entrepreneurship rates are especially high in the engineering and technology sector. About a quarter of engineering and technology companies founded between 2006 and 2012 had at least one founder who was born abroad, according to a 2012 Kauffman Foundation study. In Silicon Valley, the share was 43.9 perce…

How MOOCs and competency-based learning shaping the future of online higher education?

Two models of higher education--competency-based learning and MOOCs--are offering alternatives to conventional higher education and shaping the future of online higher education. Given below are recent developments which highlight this trend:
Southern New Hampshire University, a private university in New Hampshire, "is poised to launch a $5,000 online, competency-based associate degree that would be the first to blow up the credit hour--the connection between college credit and the time students spend learning." In addition, it had been in gaining attention for its aggressive growth in online programs as a non-profit. It enrolled 2,750 undergraduates in its campus and another 25,000 in its online programs. The revenue for this "Little College That's a Giant Online" is forecasted to reach $200 million in the next academic year—four times what it took in for 2010-11.
Western Governors University founded by the governors of 19 U.S. states in 1995, is an online univ…

Could MOOCs revolutionize international student recruitment and transnational education?

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MOOCs--Massive Open and Online Courses, have been in news for their potential to be "revolutionary" in learning space. Tom Friedman says that "Big breakthroughs happen when what is suddenly possible meets what is desperately necessary."

With innovative, adaptive, high-quality learning opportunity offered at a low-cost, perhaps, MOOCs are at the cusp of making a big breakthrough. It is not only going to increase competitive pressure on for-profit online education sector but also traditional not-for-profit universities and colleges. Both of them have to justify their cost-structures and value of credential in times of increasing competition and decreasing resources.

In the world of international higher education, I believe that MOOCs offer two unintentional influences:

1. International Student Recruitment:
Given that international student recruitment is a costly and complex affair which is becoming even more challenging with the limitations of using recruitment agents

Quality assurance in for-profit education: Tame risks, not growth

"If quality assurance is partly about risk, are for-profit institutions inherently more risky than public institutions?", asks a discussions paper released by Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and UNESCO) based on a recent meeting on for-profit higher education.

The paper looks into the quality assurance challenges and needs with internationalization of for-profit higher education institutions supported by ambitious growth goals and technological advancements with e-learning models. It is becoming increasingly complex to assure quality in a multi-country delivery format. For example, there are 420,000 people outside the UK pursuing UK degrees through a range of models in 100 countries.

I agree with report at one level and disagree on another.
Agree: For-profit is indispensable in meeting global demand The report notes, "...taking an international perspective, it may be that distinguishing within the private sector between for-profit and not-for-profit in…

Guru Mantra: Maggie Johnson, Education & University Relations, Google

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Successful models of university-industry relations are very important in aligning competencies, fostering innovation and funding research. This week Dr. Maggie Johnson shares some of the initiatives at Google. Also see earlier interviews with Dr. Jim Spohrer, Director, University Relations, IBM and Dr. Ganesh Natarajan, CEO, Zensar.
- Dr. Rahul Choudaha

Dr. Maggie Johnson
Director of Education and University Relations
Google

Maggie Johnson is Director of Education and University Relations for Google. She manages all technical training and leadership development programs for Google engineers and operations staff, as well as Google’s educational outreach efforts. She also manages the university relations area, building strategic partnerships with faculty and labs globally. Prior to Google, Maggie was a faculty member and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University.


Rahul- What excites you about your role as the Director of Education an…

Guru Mantra: Jason Katcher, Google

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Jason Katcher
Head of Education & Recruitment Advertising
Google

Jason has spent the last 3 years helping drive the for-profit education sector within Google’s North American advertising division. His team oversees relationships with the majority of the marquee players in the private sector education, helping customers and agencies navigate the Google ecosystem to connect with potential students in a cost-effective, transparent manner. Through direct response and brand marketing channels, his team continues to serve as both media partner and advisor to schools in the dynamic world of digital marketing. Joining Google in January 2005, Jason helped to establish the inside sales focus around Google's Local business practice mainly to real estate, automotive and employment business models. Before joining Google, Jason spent 3 years in the traditional media business publishing a government recruitment trade magazine which helped to connect large defense contractors and federal agenc…

Guru Mantra: Keith Hampson, Director, Ryerson University

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Guru Mantra
Dr. Keith Hampson
Director, Digital Education Strategies
Ryerson University
Toronto, Canada

Keith Hampson is Director, Digital Education Strategies at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. Prior to entering university management, he was a member of the University Faculty, where he lectured on contemporary media and consumer culture. He has a number of publication credits; most recently as the coauthor of Mastering Digital Research: A Guide for Students (2009). He is founder of LinkedIn’s “Higher Education Management Group” with close to six thousand members.
Dr. Hampson is an experienced higher education consultant who has worked with companies such as Flat World Knowledge, Eduventures, Pearson Education, WebCT, Ninthhouse Communications, Digital Learning Interactive, Nelson Education, The McGraw- Hill Companies, Convergence Management Consultants, Canadian International Development Agency, NEXTMove Communications and has served on the advisory boards of Flat World Knowledge…

Education: The IBM Way

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IBM Smarter Planet initiative notes that the world continues to get smaller and flatter, and now the planet needs to get "smarter." It highlights the need to solve some of the most pressing problems of the world by leveraging technology.

Education is one such domain which is getting "smarter" by technology and has intricate relationship with the overall improvement of quality of life. IBM's approach to develop Education for a Smarter Planet emphasizes that "smarter education will reshape learning not around administrative processes, but around the two key components of any education system: the student and the teacher." This is important as it suggests that next wave of efficiency in education will come from adaptablity of learning processes instead of inflexibility of unversity administrative systems.

The Future of Learning paper identifies five key challenges (see Figure) which impacts students, workers and institutions.

One of these five challenge…