Showing posts with the label Quality

Webinar resources: The future of online higher education and global engagement

How likely it is that by 2020 “degrees will be disaggregated into smaller credential units… with the possibility that the credentialing entity may be different from the institution that offers the course”? The majority (68%) of the webinar participants responding to a poll question based on MIT’s Future of Education report expect it to be a "likely" or "very likely" scenario of higher education.

The online discussion was second in the series of online thought leadership discussions hosted by University World News and DrEducation. The online discussion on the theme of "Embracing Technology for Global Engagement: A Leadership Challenge and Opportunity" attracted nearly 700 registrations from around the world.

Access the webinar recording below
Access the PowerPoint slides 
Read the UWN summary article
Access Twitter feeds with #GlobalEd2

The webinar moderated by Dr. Rahul Choudaha, principal researcher & CEO, DrEducation included following expert panel:

Transnational Education: A University World News webinar in partnership with DrEducation

University World News will be hosting a free webinar in partnership with DrEducation, LLC on the theme of emerging trends and issues related to the growth and quality of transnational education on Tuesday, May 24, 2016.

[  The webinar recording is available here. ]
Cross-border delivery of higher education is becoming a financial necessity for some institutions and a strategic differentiation for others. Transnational education (TNE) takes many forms ranging from joint-degrees and branch campuses to recent emergence of technology-enabled learning. While TNE has provided new opportunities for global engagement and expansion for many institutions, these models often come with challenges of quality. Is growth of TNE dependent on more flexible standards of quality? Or, are we stifling innovation in TNE by putting too many barriers for experimentation?

• Rahul Choudaha, PhD, (Chair), Principal Researcher & CEO, DrEducation, LLC &
• Nigel Healey, PhD, Pro-Vice-Chancel…

4 reasons why LinkedIn may be a gamechanger in global university rankings

Much has been debated and researched about the uses and abuses of university rankings. Now, the arena of global university rankings has a new contender, LinkedIn, which has the potential to change the future of the rankings game. Here are the four reasons in support of LinkedIn’s potential.

1. Sharper focus on career outcomes
LinkedIn is focused on career outcomes. One of the biggest limitations of the rankings is that they focus on students as consumers of information, while their methodologies focus on proxies like research citations. An alternative approach is to use metrics that directly impact students. In a cost-conscious environment where the value of higher education is under increasing scrutiny, return on investment and career outcome is becoming more important for students.

2. Deeper view at program level
The multi-disciplinary and comprehensive nature of universities is better captured by program rankings than by university rankings. Program-level rankings are not only more…

Employers and Technology as the Ultimate Solution to Credentialing Barrier of MOOCs?

A recent report entitled “The Carnegie Unit: A Century-Old Standard in a Changing Education Landscape” from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching responds to increasing pressure on bringing more innovation, flexibility and transparency in measuring students learning. (See definitions of The Carnegie Unit and the Credit Hour on page 8 of report. A typical three-credit course, meets for three hours per week over a fifteen-week semester.) The study finds that in absence of an alternative, the Carnegie Unit continues to be the standard measure in the American education system. "But at best, the Carnegie Unit is a crude proxy for student learning. The U.S. education system needs more informative measures of student performance. Achieving this goal would require the development of rigorous standards, assessments, and accountability systems—difficult work, especially in the field of higher education, where educational aims are highly varied and faculty autonomy is de…

Efficient Design and Delivery of Higher Education Service

Patrick Harker, president of the University of Delaware was interviewed based on his commentary "Making Sense of Higher Education’s Future: An Economics and Operations Perspective" published in Service Science. (On a side note, Service Science is an interdisciplinary field that aims at studying and improving service systems. My dissertation focused on developing a curriculum for a master's program in engineering and management. Service Science is supported by IBM.) Harkin borrows from the principles of operations management and characteristics of services to argue for a change in the design and delivery of education. From operations management, we know that design of the service or product drives its performance, as it is influences the cost structures and delivery constraints. "Design determines how competitive it is in the marketplace. A great design delivers ef´Čücient value to customers or clients."

Harkin argues that one of the limitations of design of edu…

How rankings impact institutional strategies and processes? research report from European University Association

What is role of rankings in university strategies and processes? This is the central question of the recent research report released by European University Association and authored by Ellen Hazelkorn, Tia Loukkola and Therese Zhang.  The report entitled "Rankings in Institutional Strategies and Processes: Impact or Illusion?" is based on the survey of 171 higher education institutions from 39 European countries. It is a comprehensive and insightful report that shows that perceived impact of rankings is very high among different stakeholders despite their public denials.  More than half of all the respondents identified that they "have one or several persons at institution level who monitor(s) our position in the rankings regularly." Here are couple of data points indicating that institutional representatives perceive rankings to be of very high importance to prospective students:

The report asserts "...when an institution is analysing the importance of one ra…

Towards improved quality standards in transnational education

The quality assurance mechanisms of transnational education (TNE) or cross-border education have not kept pace with the changes in the landscape of its activities and trends is the core argument of the article I co-authored with Richard J Edelstein, a research associate at the Center for Studies in Higher Education, University of California, Berkeley.

TNE is offered in a range of models, including branch campuses, licensed foreign degree programs provided by local institutions, articulation agreements, distance learning degrees and online degrees.
The variety of models is reflective of diverse contexts of source and destination countries, where demand from the emerging segment of ‘glocal’ students - who have aspirations to gain a global education experience, but want to remain in their local region/country - is creating new opportunities for institutions.
The landscape of TNE gets further complicated with the emergence of new distance learning technologies, such as MOOCs, that ar…

AACSB Sr. VP on Global Engagement and Changes in Management Education

Dr. Timothy S. Mescon is the fourth president of Columbus State University. He assumed that responsibility in August 2008. Previously, for 18 years, Dr. Mescon was Dean at the Michael J. Coles College of Business at Kennesaw State University in Atlanta, where he held the Tony and Jack Dinos Eminent Scholar Chair of Entrepreneurship. Dr. Mescon is the author of more than 200 articles and cases and has co-authored four books, his latest, Entrepreneurship: Venture Initiation, Management and Development. Additionally, he has co-authored an audiotape series entitled Management Excellence. Dr. Mescon received his Ph.D. from the University of Georgia, MBA from Southern Methodist University and B.A. from Tulane University. In September 2014 he was named as the inaugural Senior Vice President and Chief Officer for Europe, the Middle East and Africa for AACSB International, a position he will formally begin January 2015. How exciting it is for me to be directly involved in the launch of AACSB I…

Will Indian higher education move from stifling regulation to authentic quality assurance?

Indian higher education is in a state of flux due to an incoherent policy framework. For example, recent scrapping of the four-year degree program at the University of Delhi also affected private universities which were trying to bring four-year liberal arts program in India. What is appalling is that quality assurance framework in India is not only archaic and complex, but also lacks the capability to distinguish wheat from the chaff. While private higher education has its own challenges of quality, there are models of excellence that need to be showcased and encouraged to uplift the quality in private sector. Here is a guest blog from Dr. Vidya Rajiv Yeravdekar, head of Symbiosis International University-one of the premier private deemed-university-on unfair treatment of private higher education in India. She asks why toughest regulations are designed for private higher education which receives no funding while there is no oversight of public institutions which get all their finance…

International Branch Campuses of UK Universities in UAE: Highlights from QAA

Quality Assurance Agency of UK released a very insightful report entitled "Review of UK Transnational Education in United Arab Emirates." It provides an overview of the scale and scope of the overseas branch campus activity of British universities in UAE. It is an important indicator as, according to the report "the UAE is the country hosting the largest number of international branch campuses in the world, currently hosting 37 from 11 different countries, with the UK being the highest sending country."
The report notes that "of all UK higher education institutions, 70 of them (over 40 per cent) were engaged in some form of TNE activity in the UAE in 2012-13. This activity involves just over 15,000 students, representing an increase of 37 per cent during the past two years. This increase has been most noticeable in the number of students studying in the two large branch campuses of Heriot-Watt University and Middlesex University, which account for 78 per cent…

Three Solutions for Reforming Indian Higher Education

Comparative and International Education Society’s (CIES) Higher Education Special Interest Group (HESIG) published its fall 2014 issue on BRIC countries. I have contributed an article on the reforming Indian higher education. I recommend three solutions to manage the complexity of the system: First, enforce higher standards of transparency and disclosures for private higher education institutions; second, strengthen the vocational and doctoral education pipeline; third, professionalize the sector through stronger institutional responsibility.

The special "BRIC" issue includes related articles on following themes: Chinese MOOCs on the Way: Opportunities and Challenges Yu Zhang, Yeqin Kang, and Manli Lia Higher Education in Brazil: Different Worlds and Diverse Beliefs, Elizabeth Balbachevsky Dispelling Illusions of Homogeneity: Growing Disparities in Higher Education Access in the Post-Soviet Regions, Anatoly OleksiyenkoPublic Funding and the Beginning of a New Era in High…

Looking back at international higher eduction in 2013: The year of funding constraints, regulatory pressures and learning innovations

At the beginning of 2013, I projected that the three mega-trends influencing global higher education will be related to university budgets/funding, regulatory environment and technological innovations. I concluded that 2013 will be a year in which the higher education sector, will be under increasing pressure to justify its value, not only from financial and regulatory side pressures but due to emergence of competing technology-enabled learning models like MOOCs.

By the end of 2013, there have been several developments aligning with the  mega-trends forecast. Here are some of the key stories from 2013.

- Funding and university budgets: Given that higher education is tightly coupled with the economy, a sense of recovery is also reflecting a slight turnaround in university budgets in the US. However, optimism is not reflected in self-sufficiency through tuition revenue as the college enrollment in the US declines. In a recent survey,  about four in 10 public universities report that tui…

How to engage foreign universities in India?

The Foreign universities bill 2010 has attracted lot of curiosity and interest from media and universities to assess its potency and implications.  The bill is still pending after three years and it is pretty much written off. However, the recent executive order by the University Grants Commission allowing foreign universities to enter India has reignited the curiosity. In my commentary article "How to Engage Foreign Universities in India" published in Business Standard, I argue that the optimism is unfounded and it will again be a non-starter. The proposed order is not aligned with the reality of global higher education and the needs of Indian higher education. Here is the excerpt.

Statistics on Indian Higher Education 2012-2013

What are the different types of degree-granting institutions (universities/colleges) in India? What is the enrollment of Indian students by level of education? What are the top fields of study for Indian Students? These are some of the frequently asked questions about data and statistics related to the size and scale of Indian higher education system. Given below is the latest information available from University Grants Commission of India.

Please click here to see latest data for 2016 and growth from 2008.

Global market in transnational education by Nigel Healey

Transnational education in its various forms had been growing both in quantity and qualitative complexity. I came across Prof. Healey's informative slides on TNE from QS-APPLE conference and asked him to narrate the key conclusions. I especially found slide #10/11 about "Oxford Brookes effect" quite interesting. This is primarily an effect of Oxford Brookes' partnership with ACCA offered in several countries including Pakistan and Sri Lanka. A report by the 1994 Group explains that the "Data on ‘students studying wholly outside the UK’ is skewed by large numbers studying at Oxford Brooks. Oxford Brookes started returning data in 2008/09 for students studying for a BSc in Applied Accounting in partnership with ACCA. This BSc is a partnerships with ACCA where students on the ACCA programme receive a BSc qualifi cation from Oxford Brookes if they submit a satisfactory “Research and Analysis Project” to Oxford Brookes." (p.14).

Nigel Healey
Nottingham Tre…

12 Things to Know about Asian Higher Education: ADB

Asian Development Bank posted 12 Things to Know in 2012: Higher Education on its website reasserting the issue of expansion of systems without preparedness to cope with quality and access. Here are the 12 issues and facts from ADB:
Over the last 20 years, higher education systems across Asia have experienced a sharply increased demand for access.Universities in many developing member countries suffer from inadequate infrastructure and weak instruction. Low quality is the greatest challenge facing higher educations systems across the region.Financial support for higher education dropped sharply in the 1990s and 2000s as the central development challenge of the era was to expand access to basic education.The World Bank has argued that sustainable poverty reduction will not be achieved without a renaissance in the higher education systems of developing countries.Countries that give individuals one additional year of education can boost productivity and raise economic output by 3% to 6% o…

Types of Universities in India and Growth of "Private State Universities"

Private Universities in India have grown from 16 to 140 in five years (124%) and from 100 to 140 in less than a year. This is astonishing growth as only universities in India have degree awarding power. Colleges are "affiliated" to universities as teaching institutions.

Indian higher education is not only large in scope but complex in its working and evolution. One indicator is existence of four different types of universities depending on who funds them and regulates them. For example, Deemed to be Universities come under the purview of UGC and are mostly funded by private resources (Here is a previous comprehensive story and a more recent development). They were also in controversy for corruption and qualitative deficiencies for profiteering. This also tainted the name of some of the better quality private Deemed to be Universities. Here is the list of Deemed to be Universities.

Given the regulatory and media attention to the deficiencies with Deemed to be Universities, P…

Impact of London Met trouble on international student mobility

London Met is now the poster-child of how frequently changing immigration policies coupled with institutional desperation for recruiting foreign students for revenue rationales could hurt future of many. Student are disillusioned and frustrated, London Met has lost its reputation and the UK has put at risk its credibility to attract international students in the immediate term. After tightening of student visa norms and requirement of interviews for international students, London Met fiasco is too detrimental for the UK higher education.

This in turn is going to financially hurt London Met and the UK higher education. "In 2010-11, English universities increased their income from overseas student tuition fees by 16 per cent to £2.5 billion. Fees paid by overseas students made up 10.9 per cent of the sector's income, 'the highest on record', according to the Higher Education Funding Council for England.  The loss of its licence will likely cause great financial pain fo…

Transparency for a Change in Higher Education

Given below is my recent article published in the Economic Times Blog on the need of a transparent and accountable higher education system to enhance quality and foster competition.

Indian higher education system has expanded at a break-neck speed. Nearly 20,000 colleges were added between 2000-01 and 2010-11 and the number of students enrolled doubled from nearly 8.4 million to 17 million in this decade, according to the University Grants Commission (UGC).

However, this much needed expansion came at the expense of quality. The number of seats remaining vacant in some disciplines like engineering, underemployment and unemployment among educated youth and incessant desire to collect more degrees for advancing career are some of the indicators of the inadequate quality of education imparted. In addition, we continue to hear cases of malpractices and corruption among regulators and institutions in compromising standards.

Minister Kapil Sibal has attempted to bring a change by proposing…

Foreign University Collaborations in India: Will Top-Ranked Institutions be Interested?

"A comprehensive legislation will be introduced in Parliament shortly to regulate entry of foreign universities and educational institutions in the country" according to Times of India. Can you guess the year in which this line was written? No, not 2010, its 2002. That's right it had been nearly a decade in history of Indian politics and the rhetoric has not changed. So, we should not be very disappointed if Foreign Universities Bill along with several other important bills have not yet seen the light of approval in last two years.

In this context, my first impression of the recent announcement by UGC to allow joint-degrees and twinning collaborations between Indian and foreign institutions was of continued skepticism which later changed to cautious optimism.

Elizabeth Redden of InsideHigherEd quoted me in a story covering the development. My reason for cautious optimism is that "given the dual requirements regarding accreditation and ranking many of the predatory …