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Webinar resources: The future of online higher education and global engagement

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How likely it is that by 2020 “degrees will be disaggregated into smaller credential units… with the possibility that the credentialing entity may be different from the institution that offers the course”? The majority (68%) of the webinar participants responding to a poll question based on MIT’s Future of Education report expect it to be a "likely" or "very likely" scenario of higher education.


The online discussion was second in the series of online thought leadership discussions hosted by University World News and DrEducation. The online discussion on the theme of "Embracing Technology for Global Engagement: A Leadership Challenge and Opportunity" attracted nearly 700 registrations from around the world.

Access the webinar recording below
Access the PowerPoint slides 
Read the UWN summary article
Access Twitter feeds with #GlobalEd2




The webinar moderated by Dr. Rahul Choudaha, principal researcher & CEO, DrEducation included following expert panel:
Gi…

Employers and Technology as the Ultimate Solution to Credentialing Barrier of MOOCs?

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A recent report entitled “The Carnegie Unit: A Century-Old Standard in a Changing Education Landscape” from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching responds to increasing pressure on bringing more innovation, flexibility and transparency in measuring students learning. (See definitions of The Carnegie Unit and the Credit Hour on page 8 of report. A typical three-credit course, meets for three hours per week over a fifteen-week semester.) The study finds that in absence of an alternative, the Carnegie Unit continues to be the standard measure in the American education system. "But at best, the Carnegie Unit is a crude proxy for student learning. The U.S. education system needs more informative measures of student performance. Achieving this goal would require the development of rigorous standards, assessments, and accountability systems—difficult work, especially in the field of higher education, where educational aims are highly varied and faculty autonomy is de…

Pearson--lessons in strategy and change from a global education company

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A recent story in the Fortune magazine traces the transformation of Pearson from a traditional publishing house to a global education company poised for an digital learning era. The attention-grabbing headline "Everybody hates Pearson" leads the reader into an insightful story of opportunities and challenges faced by Pearson in the pursuit of its strategic choice of focusing on "data-driven education." Here is a timeline of the major milestones in Pearson's history.   Pearson in its recently released annual report notes that "Pearson’s strategy centres on a significant and exciting long-term opportunity: the sustained and growing global demand for greater access, achievement and affordability in education." It adds that "Pearson stands at the intersection of new technology (with its ability to engage, personalise, diagnose and scale) and new, more effective, ways of teaching." In 2015, five priorities will guide Pearson's work: …

Efficient Design and Delivery of Higher Education Service

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Patrick Harker, president of the University of Delaware was interviewed based on his commentary "Making Sense of Higher Education’s Future: An Economics and Operations Perspective" published in Service Science. (On a side note, Service Science is an interdisciplinary field that aims at studying and improving service systems. My dissertation focused on developing a curriculum for a master's program in engineering and management. Service Science is supported by IBM.) Harkin borrows from the principles of operations management and characteristics of services to argue for a change in the design and delivery of education. From operations management, we know that design of the service or product drives its performance, as it is influences the cost structures and delivery constraints. "Design determines how competitive it is in the marketplace. A great design delivers ef´Čücient value to customers or clients."

Harkin argues that one of the limitations of design of edu…

Looking back at international higher eduction in 2013: The year of funding constraints, regulatory pressures and learning innovations

At the beginning of 2013, I projected that the three mega-trends influencing global higher education will be related to university budgets/funding, regulatory environment and technological innovations. I concluded that 2013 will be a year in which the higher education sector, will be under increasing pressure to justify its value, not only from financial and regulatory side pressures but due to emergence of competing technology-enabled learning models like MOOCs.

By the end of 2013, there have been several developments aligning with the  mega-trends forecast. Here are some of the key stories from 2013.

- Funding and university budgets: Given that higher education is tightly coupled with the economy, a sense of recovery is also reflecting a slight turnaround in university budgets in the US. However, optimism is not reflected in self-sufficiency through tuition revenue as the college enrollment in the US declines. In a recent survey,  about four in 10 public universities report that tui…

Is India ahead in industrialization of education?

Here are two very interesting videos highlighting the need for an education system that builds on the strengths of a student and not necessarily mass produces them through a factory line. First, Sir Ken Robinson urges to break the industrial model of education and move to agricultural model. Industrial model pursues "linearity" and "conformity" while agricultural model accepts diversity of talent and creates enabling environment for growth.

Second, video from a New York Times story, is about what every college aspiring Indian student knows--how competitive it is to get into top professional colleges. This directly proves how Indian education system is truly "industrialized" and how middle-class children are tunnel-visioned in terms of career options. It seems India is definitely more industrialized at least by the definition of Sir Robinson as linearity and conformity are very deeply ingrained throughout the educational pipeline.

What are the solutions?…

Student Exchanges: Internationalization of B-Schools

A recent story in the New York Times highlights the trend among US business schools to widen the scope of international learning experiences for full time MBA students. Adding international experiences strengthens student learning, expands faculty research and enhances prestige of the institution in an increasing competitive environment.

Even in India, international collaborations are emerging as one major area of pursuit especially among the leading business schools. For example, premier institutions like ISB , IIM-AIIM- B , and MDI have already built extensive student exchange programs.

One of major challenge for Indian institutions face is to convince prospective partners about their ability to deliver quality experience to international students. This challenge seems to be of greater magnitude in attracting the US B-schools as compared to European B-schools.  For example. IIM-A has partnered with only 9 American B-schools as compared to 26 European B-schools. Likewise, for II…

Education: The IBM Way

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IBM Smarter Planet initiative notes that the world continues to get smaller and flatter, and now the planet needs to get "smarter." It highlights the need to solve some of the most pressing problems of the world by leveraging technology.

Education is one such domain which is getting "smarter" by technology and has intricate relationship with the overall improvement of quality of life. IBM's approach to develop Education for a Smarter Planet emphasizes that "smarter education will reshape learning not around administrative processes, but around the two key components of any education system: the student and the teacher." This is important as it suggests that next wave of efficiency in education will come from adaptablity of learning processes instead of inflexibility of unversity administrative systems.

The Future of Learning paper identifies five key challenges (see Figure) which impacts students, workers and institutions.

One of these five challenge…