Showing posts with the label India

Latest data and statistics on Indian higher education and new regulatory reform

Could Indian government transform the future of Indian higher education with its latest reform proposal of bringing two leading regulators under one umbrella? In a recent update, the  the Human Resources Development (HRD) Ministry which is responsible for higher education has proposed a new body--Higher Education Empowerment Regulation Agency (HEERA)--which will merge two leading regulatory bodies.

In its current regulatory structure, the two regulatory bodies--University Grants Commission (UGC) and All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE)--are often at loggerheads in terms of their jurisdictions and approaches. UGC is primarily responsible for universities sector while AICTE is responsible for engineering and business colleges which are affiliated to universities.

They both have gone through their phases of confusion and corruption. For example there was a tussle between UGC and AICTE on who has power to regulate technical education (engineering and business) in India. Then …

Number of international students on Optional Practical Training in the USA: Analysis of data and trends

One of the leaked draft executive orders on Vox focuses on limiting legal immigration. It is entitled "Protecting American Jobs and Workers by Strengthening the Integrity of Foreign Worker Visa Programs." Among its several provisions are the employment-based visas and Optional Practical Training (OPT). It states:

(iv) consider ways to make the process for allocating H-1B visas more efficient and ensure that beneficiaries of the program are the best and the brightest;

(vii) propose for notice and comment a regulation that would reform practical training programs for foreign students to prevent the disadvantaging of U.S. students in the workforce, better protect U.S. and foreign workers affected by such programs, restore the integrity of student visa programs, ensure compliance, and improve monitoring of foreign students

Vox reports that this order could "...reverse Obama’s extension of the duration of Optional Practical Training work visas and decision to allow the spouses…

Latest data on international students: Comparing US and UK enrollment trends

International student market in entering a phase of hyper-competition and turbulence. With the changing political contexts, the top two destinations for international students--US and UK--are experiencing challenges in maintaining their attractiveness.

At the institutional level, universities and colleges with the global brand recognition and rankings will face limited challenges while the majority of the institutions will struggle to recruit international students and meet their enrollment goals.

I have analyzed the data from HESA, UK and IIE, US for 2015-16 enrollment. Here are some of the inferences based on the comparative analysis of the international student mobility data:
American higher education institutions are more dependent on China and India as compared to British institutions US and UK have witnessed contrasting trends with at least four places of origin—India, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and Hong Kong The growth rate for Chinese students in the US far outstrips than in the UK …

Indian higher education institutions aspire to recruit more international students

Here is an excerpt from my article published in The Economic Times based on a panel presentation at 2016 FICCI Higher Education Summit.

India is the second largest source of internationally mobile students around the world. According to the UNESCO data, in 2015, nearly 234,000 Indian students were enrolled in universities and colleges abroad. In contrast, Indian universities and colleges hosted nearly 39,000 degree-seeking international students.

The Government of India is keen on enhancing the attractiveness of India as a destination for international students. At the same time, some Indian institutions are keen on making use of the 15% additional seats available to them for enrolling foreign students.

However, India faces increasing competition as many other destinations have already been active in creating government policies and institutional capacities for attracting global talent. For example, in 2015, Malaysia and China hosted more than 60,000 and 123,000 degree-seeking interna…

Demonetization of Indian currency and its impact on mobility and enrollment of Indian students in 2017

What will be the impact of demonetization of Indian currency on Indian students planning to study abroad in 2017? Here is an excerpt of the article published in Forbes by Rahul Choudaha and Di Hu. 
On November 8, the Prime Minster of Indian announced a demonetization policy which made 86% of the currency in circulation invalid as a legal tender. With the application deadlines for most institutions ranging from November to February, the timing of demonetization could not have been worse as many were still making sense of the implications of the recent Presidential elections.

Student visa processes require showing proof of availability of funds for the first year of tuition and living expenses. Given that total annual expenses can range from US$ 30,000 to US$ 70,000, many Indian students were using short-term borrowing for visa approvals and education abroad.

Clearly, in this context demonetization is likely to affect the willingness and ability of Indian students to study abroad, howev…

Making India as a destination of choice for international students: Institutional strategies and best practices

12th FICCI HIGHER EDUCATION SUMMIT will take place from November 10-12, 2016 in Delhi. The overarching theme of the conference is opportunities and challenges for attracting foreign students to India.

I will be participating in a session "Making 'Learn in India' Happen!" which will deliberate on making India the preferred choice of study for the international students. The panel comprises of following speakers:

Dr Rahul Choudaha, CEO, DrEducation, USA Prof Furqan Qamar, Secretary General, Association of Indian Universities (AIU) Mr Rakesh Ranjan, Joint Secretary, Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD) Mr Daniel C. Stoll, Associate Dean, Georgetown University Dr G Vishwanathan, Chancellor, VITDr Vidya Yeravdekar, Vice Chancellor, Symbiosis University 
I will focus three critical success factors for institutions:

Understanding diverse segments of international students Investing in international student experience Developing a profession on international education …

How many students from India, China and Korea study in the US for business and management programs?

One out of every five international students in the U.S. is enrolled in Business/Management programs. The number of international students in undergraduate (associate's and bachelor's) and graduate (master's and doctoral) programs increased by 36% from 145,514 in 2009/10 to 197,258 in 2014/15, according to IIE Open Doors data. This data indicates total enrollment across the duration of the programs and not annual new intake.
The share of top-3 countries of origin--China, India, and S. Korea--among all international students in Business/Management programs grew from 41% (59,329) to 53% (105,429). This growth was driven by China which grew by 160% in contrast to 11% and 13% decline for India and S. Korea.
The majority of the Indian students are in master's-level programs. Many are also in specialized master's programs like MS in Management and not an MBA. Based on the total enrollment of about 16,000 students in 2014/15, I would estimate that annual intake of new MB…

FICCI HES: Opportunities for global engagement with Indian higher education

FICCI Higher Education Summit 2016 will take place from November 10-12, 2016 in New Delhi. Since starting in 2004, the conference has grown in scale and engagement opportunities. More than 1000 national and international delegates including Indian and foreign University Presidents, Vice Chancellors and Deans are expected to participate. The conference discusses trends, policies and strategies related to Indian higher education and opportunities for international engagement.

DrEducation is pleased to join the summit as the international outreach partner. Dr. Rahul Choudaha, will be participating on the panel on policies and strategies for attracting international students to India. Here are the select articles and blogs on India.

What are the latest trends with international student enrollment for master's degree?

The latest report from the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) suggests that the demand for American degree among international students is strong.

Only 1 of 8 international students who applied to study for a master’s degree or certificate succeeded in enrolling in U.S. higher education. The report is based on a survey of 351 institutions, which enrolled nearly three-fourths of all international students in graduate programs in the United States.

In 2015, American institutions received more than 520,000 applications from abroad. Only 65,000 students enrolled. American universities made offers to only one out of three applicants, rejecting over 346,000 students. At the same time, 111,000 students received the offer but decided not to enroll at a U.S. institution.

Transnational education programs offer new opportunities of absorbing the demand from international markets by leveraging technology and still offering value to "glocal" students who want to earn an international cre…

Investing in informed enrollment strategies and adapting to trends in international student mobility

US higher education enrolled nearly 975,000 international students in 2014-2015, an increase of 52% since 2007/08 or 350,000 students more in seven years. What are the underlying growth patterns and implications for institutional strategies? 

Looking deeper into the numbers, it becomes apparent that not all institutions have been successful in attracting international students. For example, 1 out of 5 international students is enrolled in just 25 institutions. Beyond these few institutions, majority face challenges in attracting international students. On the one hand, there are challenges of limited resources and expertise and on the one hand, there are constraints of location and rankings. Higher education institutions must invest in a deeper understanding of international student mobility trends with a focus on shifting needs, expectations and decision-making processes to build informed and sustainable enrollment strategies

Here are three charts from IIE Open Doors’ data tha…

Highfliers from India and Explorers from China drive growth in enrollment in US

Here is my article first published on Huffington Post.

The latest Open Doors data indicates yet another year of growth in international student enrollment. Between 2009 and 2014, the number of international students has increased by 41 per cent to reach a total of 974,926. They contributed over $30 billion to the U.S. economy during the 2014-2015 academic year, according to NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

In last ten years, international enrollments skyrocketed at some institutions, while others have lagged behind, resulting in an imbalance which can have negative implications for both institutions and individuals. Despite the growth, the proportion of international students to total US higher education enrollment is only 4.8 per cent. There is also a skew in terms of source countries.

More than half of all international students in the US come from four countries, China, India, South Korea and Saudi Arabia. Often, international students are lumped as one monolithic b…

Open Doors 2015: What to expect with international student enrollment trends?

How has the enrollment of international students at higher education institutions in the United States changed in fall 2014 as compared to fall 2013? The Open Doors 2015 will be released on November 16, 2015 to answer this question.

Here is my forecast of two leading source countries, China and India, from previous articles published in UniversityWorldNews:
"Universities need to get ready for India’s highfliers" August 2014  "A new wave of demand for global education among Indian ‘high fliers’ is set to take-off. These children of professionals who started working in new-age industries in the late '90s will create a new opportunity for foreign higher education institutions interested in engaging with India."

"In sum, I define Indian ‘high fliers’ as children born in the late '90s to parents working in new-age industries like IT, financial services and telecommunications. Many of these ‘high flier’ students will start exploring undergraduate colleges in…

More preventive measures needed in India to stop high-stakes cheating, says Britt of Prometric

Admissions to higher education institutions of excellence in India is often reliant on high-stakes testing. At the top are some of the most competitive exams like Common Admissions Test (CAT) for Indian Institute of Management (IIM) and Joint Entrance Exam (JEE) for Indian Institute of Technology (IIT). Then there are many more exams for different professions and states. More recently, a scams in the state of Madhya Pradesh exposed system-level corruption with more than 2,000 students estimated to have cheated their way into coveted medical colleges. Here is an interview with Wade Britt, Country Manager, Prometric Testing Services Pvt. Ltd., India, a test development and delivery provider. Prometric is a wholly owned, independently operated subsidiary of Educational Testing Service.

Wade Britt is the Country Manager for Prometric Testing Services Pvt. Ltd in India. He has extensive international experience in operations and sales in the education, technology and logistics sectors. Pri…

Why India should go beyond engineering and diversify with liberal arts education?

Here is an excerpt from my opinion piece "Want to save higher education in India? Go beyond engineering" published in The Economic Times.

In last 15 years, the expansion of IT sector has provided relatively bright prospects of upward social mobility for many families. While IT sector had been integral to the economic growth of the country, it has also boxed students into linear career pathways that start with competing for college entrance exams. Students are told that they can “study whatever they want, so long as it’s engineering.

I’m also a product of the factory line of engineering education and followed additional expectations by studying business management and working in IT sector. Only after working in IT sector, I introspected and realized that I am a misfit. In search of my passion, I moved to higher education sector in 2003 with a 25% cut in salary. After working for a few years, I came to the US to earn my PhD in Higher Education and formally learn about theory,…

Presenting in India and China on Internationalization of Higher Education

I will be traveling back to back for conferences in India and China and presenting on the themes of student mobility, international partnerships and exchanges and the future of liberal arts education in India.  India (Colloquium) "Internationalization of American Higher Education and its Implications for India" at the National University of Educational Planning and Administration (NUEPA), New Delhi on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. "Going Global with the Liberal Arts in India: Insights and Experiences from around the World" at the Yale-NUS The Future of Liberal Arts, New Delhi on Saturday, March 21, at 11:00 a.m. China (Workshop) "Can Asian Universities Become the Hub for International Students? Opportunities and Strategies for Maximizing Potential" at Asia-Pacific Association for International Education Annual Conference (APAIE), Beijing on Monday, March 23 at 9:00 a.m. I am chairing and organizing this workshop with presentations from: -Dr. David…

As Predicted, Number of Indian Students Studying in the US Increase

In my previous article, "Universities need to get ready for India’s high fliers", I had predicted that the number of globally mobile Indian students will increase and the US higher education will be the biggest beneficiaries. (Related story "Enter the Dragon" in BusinessWorld) Latest data from Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), reported enrollment patterns of international students as on October 2014. It confirms the overall trend and increase with Indian numbers: - Since October 2013, the number of students studying in the US from India increased 28% as compared to 9% for all international students - US higher education institutions enrolled 134, 292 students from India - 79% of them were enrolled in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, which offer 29-Optional Practical Training (STEM-extension) option - 65% of all Indian students(~87,000) were enrolled in only two majors 1) Engineering and 2)Computer Sciences - 73% of all…

Are you ready for Indian highflier students? Emerging opportunities of international recruitment and collaborations

Engaging with Indian higher education has been always been a very complex endeavour for foreign institutions. However, Indian higher education is now priming up for new opportunities to recruit students and build partnerships. This time it is different as the opportunities are largely driven by student demand as opposed to policy reform.
Soon, an emerging segment of Indian students will not only aspire to global education but will also have the ability to afford the experience. This will present new opportunities for institutions interested in engaging with India.
The traditional segment – Strivers With nearly 200,000 students enrolled outside the country, India is the second largest source of globally mobile students. However, the number of students going abroad has grown at an anaemic pace for the last five years.
Consider the case of the United States, which enrols nearly half of all globally mobile Indian students. The number of Indian students in the US has pretty much remained t…

Will Indian higher education move from stifling regulation to authentic quality assurance?

Indian higher education is in a state of flux due to an incoherent policy framework. For example, recent scrapping of the four-year degree program at the University of Delhi also affected private universities which were trying to bring four-year liberal arts program in India. What is appalling is that quality assurance framework in India is not only archaic and complex, but also lacks the capability to distinguish wheat from the chaff. While private higher education has its own challenges of quality, there are models of excellence that need to be showcased and encouraged to uplift the quality in private sector. Here is a guest blog from Dr. Vidya Rajiv Yeravdekar, head of Symbiosis International University-one of the premier private deemed-university-on unfair treatment of private higher education in India. She asks why toughest regulations are designed for private higher education which receives no funding while there is no oversight of public institutions which get all their finance…

How many students graduate from India every year?

How many students are graduate from universities and colleges in India every year? This is one of the often asked question to me. While there is data available on the number of students enrolled in Indian higher education, I have not come across any official data on number of students completing the post-graduate (master's or doctoral) or graduate (bachelor's) degree.

Please click here to see latest data for 2016 and growth from 2008.

Based on the latest enrollment figures available for 2012-13, I have estimated the student enrollment and number of graduates earning degree every year. Based on previous data, I have assumed that one out of six students enrolled in bachelor's degree programs is in four-year engineering and rest are in three-year degrees. In addition, I have estimated the rate of growth or expansion of higher education enrollment at the rate of 15% per annum. 
This results in an estimated 26.5 million students enrolled in Indian higher education in 2014-15 an…

Three Solutions for Reforming Indian Higher Education

Comparative and International Education Society’s (CIES) Higher Education Special Interest Group (HESIG) published its fall 2014 issue on BRIC countries. I have contributed an article on the reforming Indian higher education. I recommend three solutions to manage the complexity of the system: First, enforce higher standards of transparency and disclosures for private higher education institutions; second, strengthen the vocational and doctoral education pipeline; third, professionalize the sector through stronger institutional responsibility.

The special "BRIC" issue includes related articles on following themes: Chinese MOOCs on the Way: Opportunities and Challenges Yu Zhang, Yeqin Kang, and Manli Lia Higher Education in Brazil: Different Worlds and Diverse Beliefs, Elizabeth Balbachevsky Dispelling Illusions of Homogeneity: Growing Disparities in Higher Education Access in the Post-Soviet Regions, Anatoly OleksiyenkoPublic Funding and the Beginning of a New Era in High…