Showing posts with the label Higher Education

Global Webinar Series on International Higher Education

DrEducation produces and convenes a global webinar series on latest issues and trends related to internationalization of higher education. As the organizer of the event, DrEducation helps event partners reach a global audience of international educators and professionals in a credible, content-driven and cost-effective manner. More than 4,000 professionals from around the world have registered for the first four webinars on following themes:

Interested in exploring a partnership? Email us at info@DrEducation.

"The content and panelists qualified to address the content were both relevant and high quality. The format packed much information into the allotted time, doing so in an efficient, respectful way." - Dr. Jeff King, Executive Director of the Center for Excellence in Transformative Teaching and Learning University of Central Oklahoma, USA

"The webinar was especially timely given current circumstances in the US and the UK…Travel and meeting colleagues face to face at …

Webinar recording and summary: Are universities crucibles of transformative leadership?

University World News, The MasterCard Foundation, and DrEducation partnered to host a free webinar on the role of higher education in fostering transformative leadership.

This global webinar moderated by Dr. Rahul Choudaha of DrEducation and, attracted over 1,100 registrations from around the world. The expert panel included:
Barbara Stocking, President, Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge, UK Lucia Lebasha, MasterCard Foundation Scholar, Costa RicaFred Swaniker, Founder, African Leadership Academy, South AfricaPatrick Awuah, President, Ashesi University, Ghana Missed the webinar? View the webinar recording below.
Access the PowerPoint slides
Read summary article - Universities can nurture leaders of social change
Read summary article - Connecting students with life's realities
Access Twitter feeds with #GlobalEd2

Already have a password? Please enter here to access the recording.

Previous webinars from DrEducation and University World News
"Embracing T…

Indian higher education institutions aspire to recruit more international students

Here is an excerpt from my article published in The Economic Times based on a panel presentation at 2016 FICCI Higher Education Summit.

India is the second largest source of internationally mobile students around the world. According to the UNESCO data, in 2015, nearly 234,000 Indian students were enrolled in universities and colleges abroad. In contrast, Indian universities and colleges hosted nearly 39,000 degree-seeking international students.

The Government of India is keen on enhancing the attractiveness of India as a destination for international students. At the same time, some Indian institutions are keen on making use of the 15% additional seats available to them for enrolling foreign students.

However, India faces increasing competition as many other destinations have already been active in creating government policies and institutional capacities for attracting global talent. For example, in 2015, Malaysia and China hosted more than 60,000 and 123,000 degree-seeking interna…

Growth in 'glocal' students in transnational education programs for England

Transnational education is an increasingly important pathway for international students coming to the UK. They typically transfer from an overseas partner institution and then continue to stay to earn postgraduate program. This is the core finding of a recent research entitled "Transnational pathways to higher education in England" from HEFCE.

It notes that a third of the international (non EU) entrants to first degree programs (17,140 entrants) in England were transnational students, who transferred directly from overseas partner institutions. While this is a significant proportion of overall number of students enrolling in first degree programs, looking deeper into source countries, we notice that it driven by couple of countries. China and Malaysia form nearly 70% of transnational students transferring from overseas partners to England. Another interesting point is that there is very little traction for TNE programs among Indian students.

The report notes that transnati…

How to raise resources for campus internationalization strategies?

One of the recent publication from NAFSA: Association of International Educators--Developing Sustainable Resources for Internationalization--aims at providing strategies to acquire resources needed for advancing comprehensive campus internationalization efforts. The publication is very timely as there is an increasing interest among institutions to expand internationalization, but few are investing and committing the resources to the proportional level. The authors, Dr. John K. Hudzik and Dr. Penelope J. Pynes translate their extensive experiences in leading campus internationalization by providing a practical approach of engaging campus stakeholders and acquiring resources. They advise that developing sustainable resources for internationalization can be pursed through two primary channels. First by connecting internationalization to existing resources and second, by seeking new money.
1. Connect Internationalization to Existing Resources "Institutional resources already commi…

Pearson--lessons in strategy and change from a global education company

A recent story in the Fortune magazine traces the transformation of Pearson from a traditional publishing house to a global education company poised for an digital learning era. The attention-grabbing headline "Everybody hates Pearson" leads the reader into an insightful story of opportunities and challenges faced by Pearson in the pursuit of its strategic choice of focusing on "data-driven education." Here is a timeline of the major milestones in Pearson's history.   Pearson in its recently released annual report notes that "Pearson’s strategy centres on a significant and exciting long-term opportunity: the sustained and growing global demand for greater access, achievement and affordability in education." It adds that "Pearson stands at the intersection of new technology (with its ability to engage, personalise, diagnose and scale) and new, more effective, ways of teaching." In 2015, five priorities will guide Pearson's work: …

Efficient Design and Delivery of Higher Education Service

Patrick Harker, president of the University of Delaware was interviewed based on his commentary "Making Sense of Higher Education’s Future: An Economics and Operations Perspective" published in Service Science. (On a side note, Service Science is an interdisciplinary field that aims at studying and improving service systems. My dissertation focused on developing a curriculum for a master's program in engineering and management. Service Science is supported by IBM.) Harkin borrows from the principles of operations management and characteristics of services to argue for a change in the design and delivery of education. From operations management, we know that design of the service or product drives its performance, as it is influences the cost structures and delivery constraints. "Design determines how competitive it is in the marketplace. A great design delivers ef´Čücient value to customers or clients."

Harkin argues that one of the limitations of design of edu…

Will Indian higher education move from stifling regulation to authentic quality assurance?

Indian higher education is in a state of flux due to an incoherent policy framework. For example, recent scrapping of the four-year degree program at the University of Delhi also affected private universities which were trying to bring four-year liberal arts program in India. What is appalling is that quality assurance framework in India is not only archaic and complex, but also lacks the capability to distinguish wheat from the chaff. While private higher education has its own challenges of quality, there are models of excellence that need to be showcased and encouraged to uplift the quality in private sector. Here is a guest blog from Dr. Vidya Rajiv Yeravdekar, head of Symbiosis International University-one of the premier private deemed-university-on unfair treatment of private higher education in India. She asks why toughest regulations are designed for private higher education which receives no funding while there is no oversight of public institutions which get all their finance…

Can Laureate Change the Landscape of Global Higher Education?

Earlier this year, IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, announced an investment of $150 million in common stock of Laureate Education, Inc., representing IFC’s largest education investment. This was a landmark development in the world of international higher education, as it validated the model of Laureate with a significant investment. What made Laureate so successful?

how is the mobility of international doctoral students likely to shift?

University World News published a special issue on development and trends with doctoral education and student mobility across the world. I contributed a piece entitled "The future of international doctoral mobility" for this special issue. Here is an edited excerpt of the article.

In ”The Disposable Academic”, The Economist argued that "doing a PhD” was often a waste of time. However, this pessimism does not reflect the experience of all students, as evidenced by increasing numbers of doctoral students from the global South heading to the advanced economies of the North in the past 20 years.

Two primary factors influence mobility and stay rates of international doctoral students: the comparative access to opportunities for doctoral training and professional advancement between their host and home countries.

How is the mobility of international students at doctoral level likely to shift in the next 20 years? It will be shaped by the collision of two counter-trends enab…

Foreign universities in India - A reality check, again!

"A revolution is brewing in the higher education sector with foreign universities waiting for India to open its doors to them.", says The Telegraph in August 2009 and Inside Higher Ed echoed the optimism and prospects of finding "a passage to India" for foreign universities.

More than three years later sentiments have reversed with pessimism and frustration overtaking optimism. The Chronicle of Higher Education sums up with a headline "For U.S. colleges in India, great possibilities, thwarted hopes" and Times Higher Ed finds "As India plays hard to get, overseas suitors lose interest." University World News reports challenges at Leeds MET India, one of the "first" foreign campuses in India, which decided to not wait for the approval of the foreign universities bill.

Several big names like Duke Fuqua, Virginia Tech and Georgia Tech have all scaled down their ambitions from full-fledged degree campuses to smaller partnerships.

What ha…

H1 Visa: Facilitating education and employment pathways for economic development

"If anything, we have too many high-tech workers: more than nine million people have degrees in a science, technology, engineering or math field, but only about three million have a job in one", opines Ross Eisenbrey of the Economic Policy Institute in The New York Times.

Mr. Eisenbrey argues against the value of expanding the H1-B temporary visa program in STEM fields and concludes "Bringing over more — there are already 500,000 workers on H-1B visas — would obviously darken job prospects for America’s struggling young scientists and engineers. But it would also hurt our efforts to produce more: if the message to American students is, 'Don’t bother working hard for a high-tech degree, because we can import someone to do the job for less,' we could do significant long-term damage to the high-tech educational system we value so dearly."

However, Mr. Eisenbrey's opinion misses important facts related to innovation and economic development that far outwei…

12 Things to Know about Asian Higher Education: ADB

Asian Development Bank posted 12 Things to Know in 2012: Higher Education on its website reasserting the issue of expansion of systems without preparedness to cope with quality and access. Here are the 12 issues and facts from ADB:
Over the last 20 years, higher education systems across Asia have experienced a sharply increased demand for access.Universities in many developing member countries suffer from inadequate infrastructure and weak instruction. Low quality is the greatest challenge facing higher educations systems across the region.Financial support for higher education dropped sharply in the 1990s and 2000s as the central development challenge of the era was to expand access to basic education.The World Bank has argued that sustainable poverty reduction will not be achieved without a renaissance in the higher education systems of developing countries.Countries that give individuals one additional year of education can boost productivity and raise economic output by 3% to 6% o…

What Blackberry can teach foreign branch campuses about MOOCs?

Here is the excerpt from my article published in University World News.

In 2007, BlackBerry was at the forefront of the smartphones industry with over 40% of the market share in the United States. However, the iPhone offered a new choice to consumers and redefined their expectations of a smartphone.

Now Blackberry is arguably on its deathbed, with its market share slipping to less than 4% in the US. The Wall Street Journal notes that “it was a blinding confidence in the basic BlackBerry product that was at the root of RIM's [parent company of Blackberry] current troubles”.

In the same vein, MOOCs are beginning to offer a new choice to students, and are not only changing the financial equation of foreign branch campuses but also the way education is delivered as a result of technological advances.

In my previous blog [Could MOOCs lead to the decline of branch campuses?], I argued that branch campuses are infrastructure-intensive efforts with high financial and reputational risk.…

Foreign University Collaborations in India: Will Top-Ranked Institutions be Interested?

"A comprehensive legislation will be introduced in Parliament shortly to regulate entry of foreign universities and educational institutions in the country" according to Times of India. Can you guess the year in which this line was written? No, not 2010, its 2002. That's right it had been nearly a decade in history of Indian politics and the rhetoric has not changed. So, we should not be very disappointed if Foreign Universities Bill along with several other important bills have not yet seen the light of approval in last two years.

In this context, my first impression of the recent announcement by UGC to allow joint-degrees and twinning collaborations between Indian and foreign institutions was of continued skepticism which later changed to cautious optimism.

Elizabeth Redden of InsideHigherEd quoted me in a story covering the development. My reason for cautious optimism is that "given the dual requirements regarding accreditation and ranking many of the predatory …

Global Engineering Enrollment Trends

Science and engineering education and research has been at the core of economic development and innovation. Recent report by National Science Foundation offers comprehensive and comparative information of international science and engineering education. Here are five interesting data points from the report:

India Higher Education Trend 2012: Consolidation gains Momentum

The story of Indian higher education is like a F-1 racing track without any enforcement of driver safety or driving rules. For last few years, Indian higher education has grown at a break-neck speed. For example, Indian higher education has grown by 20% in one year and added more than 5,000 colleges to the system. Likewise, gross enrollment ratio (GER) grew from 12.5% in 2007-08 to 17.3% in 2009-10. Clearly, access to higher education is very important for a developing country like India and it is encouraging to see the growth.

Top Stories of 2011 in International Higher Education

The year 2011 was a tumultuous year for the world of international higher education which is increasingly getting influenced by the phenomenon of globalization. As Jane Knight notes "...internationalization is changing the world of education and globalization is changing the world of internationalization." This year also reaffirmed deep interconnection of higher education with sociopolitical and economic environment. Following three stories further emphasize these trends:

- Increasing reliance on China: 
Chinese students constitute 15% of  3.3 million globally mobile students (~510,000 students) according to UNESCO. The second largest source of globally mobile students is India which constitutes nearly 6 per cent (~195,000 students). Some campuses like University of Iowa are already heavily reliant on Chinese students which constituted half of all international students in fall 2011 (1648/3271). Already, there are concerns about the campus diversity, language issues and role…

The Missing Quality and Relevance Mindset

In November, I presented at two conferences on higher education in India--FICCI Higher Education Summit and CII.

At FICCI, I co-presented in plenary session on Internationalization with following speakers:
Mr Anand Sudarshan, MD & CEO, Manipal Education  Dr Kavita Sharma, Director, India International Centre Prof Dame Joan Stringer, Principal & Vice Chancellor, Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland Mr Nirmal Pal, Regional Director for India, Pennsylvania State UniversityDr Sheila Embleton, President, Canada India Education Council (CIEC), Canada My core argument was that India is lacking a quality mindset and internationalization is emerging as a competitive compulsion to inculcate quality. By any indicators of excellence, India is falling behind. It is ironical and embarrassing that with the largest number of B-Schools in the world, India does not have a single B-school which is AACSB accredited (B-school Bubble). Likewise, only 4,300 colleges out of ~33,000 colleges in Ind…

University leadership: Finding the right balance between academic and business expertise

The nature of higher education leadership is undergoing change in the US. Demographics of university leaders is graying and a wave of change at the top is expected. According to the American Council on Education survey, the percentage of presidents age 61 and over increased from 14 percent in 1986 to nearly half in 2006 and the average age of presidents increased from 52 years in 1986 to 60 years in 2006. Here is a chart indicating likely retirement of presidents at leading universities in the US. At another level, the changes in the external environment with increasing competition for resources, ability to raise resources. To build a competitive advantage, this may require a stronger set of business skills ranging from operational efficiency to strategic development. Thus, emphasis on business skills may increase in American institutions.

However, in the Indian context, institutions are facing another leaderships crisis and it relates to lack of professionalism and academic values a…